Author Topic: Forced adoption: five years on, there's still so much work to be done....  (Read 207 times)

Auntie Cee

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https://lens.monash.edu/2018/03/21/1335656/forced-adoption-five-years-on-and-theres-still-so-much-work-to-be-done-to-right-the-wrongs

Forced adoption: five years on, there's still so much work to be done to right the wrongs

Today marks five years since the federal governmentís Forced Adoptions Apology. In the intervening years, it's produced many very good outcomes for people affected by forced adoptions. However, there's still much work to be done, including compensation for people who were adversely affected by many illegal acts.

I've watched former prime minister Gillardís speech on many occasions. Her address on 21 March 2013 represents one of the outstanding moments of Australian history that must never be forgotten. That, together with the way in which people came together in grief and in hope, stands as one of my most vivid memories of that day. This has been an issue that's united people around the country in a way we seldom see. People have readily identified with those affected by forced adoption. It's only a pity that the issue doesn't have a higher public profile.

Forced adoption: five years on, there's still so much work to be done to right the wrongs

Today marks five years since the federal governmentís Forced Adoptions Apology. In the intervening years it's produced many very good outcomes for people affected by forced adoptions. However, there's still much work to be done, including compensation for people who were adversely affected by many illegal acts.

I've watched former prime minister Gillardís speech on many occasions. Her address on 21 March 2013 represents one of the outstanding moments of Australian history that must never be forgotten. That, together with the way in which people came together in grief and in hope, stands as one of my most vivid memories of that day. This has been an issue that's united people around the country in a way we seldom see. People have readily identified with those affected by forced adoption. It's only a pity that the issue doesn't have a higher public profile.